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Virginia’s Ridesharing Approval Diversifies Transportation Options

Little by little it’s becoming more of a challenge to own a car in Washington, DC. There are many condo and mixed-use developments springing up throughout the city, making for an ever-evolving and exciting environment to live in. If one sacrifice has to be made, however, it is that the city is becoming more densely populated and the streets aren’t getting any bigger.

Luckily for Washington, DC home owners, the city and surrounding communities are working to legalize other options for those who want to cut down or even eliminate personal car usage altogether. Just recently, the commonwealth of Virginia made provisions that make services such as Uber and Lyft legal.

Transportation Network Companies such as Uber and Lyft work off of a mobile app in which customers can order rides from drivers who are online and in the area. Fares are typically cheaper than traditional cabs as customers pay a set rate per mile and don’t tip the drivers.  Ridesharing has become increasingly popular over the last few years, but there has also been plenty of opposition. 

Although ridesharing has been in Washington, DC since 2012 the service has been limited in the greater metropolitan area as questions were raised by Virginia government officials who were concerned about safety. As of Tuesday, February 17, those concerns are at least somewhat abated as Gov. Terry McAuliffe signed legislation that would make ridesharing possible with a series of regulations and requirements. Uber drivers in Virginia must pass extensive background checks, undergo vehicle inspections and be covered by a primary insurance policy for every trip.

In addition to ridesharing, Washington, DC has also instituted bikesharing service, Capital Bikeshare. Stations situated throughout the city and greater region allow locals to check out a bike for up to 30 minutes. The service is especially popular with commuters looking for a more environmentally friendly way to travel to work.

Washington, DC Condo Developers Recognize Change

With a diversification of affordable transportation services beyond the bus and train, more Washington, DC home owners are finding reasons to ditch their cars and condo developers are certainly taking notice and taking advantage. More and more, developments are being constructed without accompanied parking.

Projects such as the development at 90 and 91 Blagden Alley, the Patterson Mansion units on Dupont Circle and a triangle-shaped development on H Street mentioned back in January, have successfully petitioned the Board of Zoning Adjustment to proceed with construction without plans for parking structures. Another project on M Street in Georgetown has been approved for a small amount of parking.

Instead of parking structures, condo owners are getting increasingly walkable neighborhoods with a few developments even offering memberships to the local carsharing and bikesharing programs.

Are you looking for the perfect Washington, DC condo in a great neighborhood? Contact me today for assistance in finding a home in this great city.